aminocaproic acid

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2D structure from PubChem
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Generic Names
  • 6-aminohexanoic acid
  • ACS
  • Aminocaproate
  • Aminocaproic
  • aminocaproic acid
  • e-aminocaproic acid
  • epsilon-ahx
  • epsilon-amino caproic acid
Trade Names
  • Acepramin
  • Acepramine
  • Afibrin
  • Amicar
  • Amikar
  • Aminokapron
  • Atsemin
  • Caplamin
  • Capracid
  • Capramol
  • Capranol
  • Caprocid
  • Caprolisin
  • EACA
  • EACS
  • Epsamon
  • Epsicapron
  • Epsikapron
  • Epsilcapramin
  • Epsilcapramine
  • Hemocaprol
  • Hemopar
  • Hepin
  • Ipsilon
  • Respramin
Brand Mixture Names

PharmGKB Accession Id:


An antifibrinolytic agent that acts by inhibiting plasminogen activators which have fibrinolytic properties.

Source: Drug Bank


For use in the treatment of excessive postoperative bleeding.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

Aminocaproic acid binds reversibly to the kringle domain of plasminogen and blocks the binding of plasminogen to fibrin and its activation to plasmin. With NO activation of plasmin, there is a reduction in fibrinolysis. This consequently will reduce the amount of bleeding post surgery. Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) have been shown to increase the risk of vascular disease. Lipoprotein 9a)a has two components, apolipoprotein B-100, linked to apolipoprotein (a). Aminocaproic acid may change the conformation of apoliprotein (a), changing its binding properties and potentially preventing the formation of lipoprotein (a).

Source: Drug Bank


Aminocaproic acid works as an antifibrinolytic. It is a derivative of the amino acid lysine. The fibrinolysis-inhibitory effects of aminocaproic acid appear to be exerted principally via inhibition of plasminogen activators and to a lesser degree through antiplasmin activity. Aminocaproic acid may be a possible prophylactic for vascular disease, as it may prevent formation of lipoprotein (a), a risk factor for vascular disease.

Source: Drug Bank

Food Interaction

Take without regard to meals.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity


Sixty-five percent of the dose is recovered in the urine as unchanged drug and 11% of the dose appears as the metabolite adipic acid.

Source: Drug Bank


Absorbed rapidly following oral administration. In adults, oral absorption appears to be a zero-order process with an absorption rate of 5.2 g/hr. The mean lag time in absorption is 10 minutes. After a single oral dose of 5 g, absorption was complete (F=1).

Source: Drug Bank


The terminal elimination half-life is approximately 2 hours.

Source: Drug Bank


A few cases of acute overdosage with intravenous administration have been reported. The effects have ranged from no reaction to transient hypotension to severe acute renal failure leading to death. The intravenous and oral LD 50 were 3.0 and 12.0 g/kg respectively in the mouse and 3.2 and 16.4 g/kg respectively in the rat. An intravenous infusion dose of 2.3 g/kg was lethal in the dog.

Source: Drug Bank


  • 169 mL/min

Source: Drug Bank

Route of Elimination

Renal excretion is the primary route of elimination, whether aminocaproic acid is administered orally or intravenously.

Source: Drug Bank

Volume of Distribution

  • 23.1 ± 6.6 L

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula


Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES


Source: OpenEye

Canonical SMILES


Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight


Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight


Source: Drug Bank


Web Resource:
National Drug Code Directory:
KEGG Compound:
KEGG Drug:
PubChem Compound:
PubChem Substance:
Therapeutic Targets Database:

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention aminocaproic acid and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

No trials found.

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.