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2D structure from PubChem
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Generic Names
  • Calcifediol
  • Calcifediol Anhydrous
  • Calcifediolum [INN-Latin]
  • Calcifidiol
Trade Names
  • Calderol
  • Delakmin
Brand Mixture Names

PharmGKB Accession Id:


The major circulating metabolite of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). It is produced in the liver and is the best indicator of the body's vitamin D stores. It is effective in the treatment of rickets and osteomalacia, both in azotemic and non-azotemic patients. Calcifediol also has mineralizing properties.

Source: Drug Bank


Used to treat vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, refractory rickets (vitamin D resistant rickets), familial hypophosphatemia and hypoparathyroidism, and in the management of hypocalcemia and renal osteodystrophy in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing dialysis. Also used in conjunction with calcium in the management and prevention of primary or corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

Calcidiol is transformed in the kidney by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1-(alpha)-hydroxylase to calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3. Calcitriol binds to intracellular receptors that then function as transcription factors to modulate gene expression. Like the receptors for other steroid hormones and thyroid hormones, the vitamin D receptor has hormone-binding and DNA-binding domains. The vitamin D receptor forms a complex with another intracellular receptor, the retinoid-X receptor, and that heterodimer is what binds to DNA. In most cases studied, the effect is to activate transcription, but situations are also known in which vitamin D suppresses transcription. Calcitriol increases the serum calcium concentrations by: increasing GI absorption of phosphorus and calcium, increasing osteoclastic resorption, and increasing distal renal tubular reabsorption of calcium. Calcitriol appears to promote intestinal absorption of calcium through binding to the vitamin D receptor in the mucosal cytoplasm of the intestine. Subsequently, calcium is absorbed through formation of a calcium-binding protein.

Source: Drug Bank


Calcidiol is the precursor of vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is a steroid hormone that has long been known for its important role in regulating body levels of calcium and phosphorus, in mineralization of bone, and for the assimilation of vitamin A. The classical manifestations of vitamin D deficiency is rickets, which is seen in children and results in bony deformaties including bowed long bones. Deficiency in adults leads to the disease osteomalacia. Both rickets and osteomalacia reflect impaired mineralization of newly synthesized bone matrix, and usually result from a combination of inadequate exposure to sunlight and decreased dietary intake of vitamin D. Common causes of vitamin D deficiency include genetic defects in the vitamin D receptor, severe liver or kidney disease, and insufficient exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D plays an important role in maintaining calcium balance and in the regulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH). It promotes renal reabsorption of calcium, increases intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and increases calcium and phosphorus mobilization from bone to plasma.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity


Calcidiol undergoes hydroxylation in the mitochondria of kidney tissue, and this reaction is activated by the renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1-(alpha)hydroxylase to produce calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol), the active form of vitamin D3.

Source: Drug Bank


Readily absorbed.

Source: Drug Bank


288 hours

Source: Drug Bank


Bone pain, constipation (especially in children or adolescents), diarrhea, drowsiness, dryness of mouth; headache (continuing), increased thirst, increase in frequency of urination, especially at night, or in amount of urine, irregular heartbeat, itching skin, loss of appetite, metallic taste, muscle pain, nausea or vomiting (especially in children or adolescents), unusual tiredness or weakness.

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula


Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES


Source: Drug Bank


Source: Drug Bank

Canonical SMILES


Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight


Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight


Source: Drug Bank


Web Resource:
KEGG Compound:
PubChem Compound:
PubChem Substance:
Therapeutic Targets Database:

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention calcidiol and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

No trials found.

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.