Drug/Small Molecule:
prazosin

PharmGKB contains no dosing guidelines for this drug/small molecule. To report known genotype-based dosing guidelines, or if you are interested in developing guidelines, click here.

PharmGKB has no annotated drug labels with pharmacogenomic information for this drug/small molecule. If you know of a drug label with PGx, send us a message.

PharmGKB contains no Clinical Variants that meet the highest level of criteria.

To see more Clinical Variants with lower levels of criteria, click the button at the bottom of the page.

Disclaimer: The PharmGKB's clinical annotations reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and peer-reviewed literature available at the time they are written and are intended only to assist clinicians in decision-making and to identify questions for further research. New evidence may have emerged since the time an annotation was submitted to the PharmGKB. The annotations are limited in scope and are not applicable to interventions or diseases that are not specifically identified.

The annotations do not account for individual variations among patients, and cannot be considered inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of other treatments. It remains the responsibility of the health-care provider to determine the best course of treatment for a patient. Adherence to any guideline is voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding its application to be made solely by the clinician and the patient. PharmGKB assumes no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the PharmGKB clinical annotations, or for any errors or omissions.

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This is a non-comprehensive list of genetic tests with pharmacogenetics relevance, typically submitted by the manufacturer and manually curated by PharmGKB. The information listed is provided for educational purposes only and does not constitute an endorsement of any listed test or manufacturer.

A more complete listing of genetic tests is found at the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).

PGx Test Variants Assayed Gene?

The table below contains information about pharmacogenomic variants on PharmGKB. Please follow the link in the "Variant" column for more information about a particular variant. Each link in the "Variant" column leads to the corresponding PharmGKB Variant Page. The Variant Page contains summary data, including PharmGKB manually curated information about variant-drug pairs based on individual PubMed publications. The PMIDs for these PubMed publications can be found on the Variant Page.

The tags in the first column of the table indicate what type of information can be found on the corresponding Variant Page.

Links in the "Gene" column lead to PharmGKB Gene Pages.

List of all prazosin variant annotations

Gene ? Variant?
(142)
Alternate Names ? Drugs ? Alleles ?
(+ chr strand)
Function ? Amino Acid?
Translation
No VIP available CA VA
rs2229109 1199G>A, 1199G>T, 167756G>A, 167756G>T, 25212652C>A, 25212652C>T, 87179809C>A, 87179809C>T, ABCB1: c.1199G>A, Ser400Asn, Ser400Ile, mRNA 1617G>A, p.Ser400Asn
C > T
C > A
Missense
Ser400Ile
Ser400Asn
No VIP available CA VA
rs72552784 201651G>A, 25178757C>T, 2995G>A, 87145914C>T, ABCB1: c.2995G>A, Ala999Thr, mRNA 3413G>A, p.Ala999Thr
C > T
Missense
Ala999Thr
No VIP available CA VA
rs9282564 118125A>G, 25262283T>C, 61A>G, 87229440T>C, ABCB1: c.61A>G, Asn21Asp, mRNA 479A>G, p.Asn21Asp
T > C
Missense
Asn21Asp
Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 142
2D structure from PubChem
provided by PubChem

Overview

Generic Names
  • Prazocin
  • Prazosin HCl
  • Prazosin Hydrochloride
  • Prazosina [INN-Spanish]
  • Prazosine [INN-French]
  • Prazosinum [INN-Latin]
Trade Names
  • Furazosin
  • Lentopres
  • Minipress
  • Minipress Xl
  • Vasoflex
Brand Mixture Names

PharmGKB Accession Id:
PA451093

Description

Prazosin is a selective alpha- 1-adrenergic receptor antagonist used to treat hypertension. It has also been used to decrease urinary obstruction and relieve symptoms associated with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. alpha 1-Receptors mediate contraction and hypertrophic growth of smooth muscle cells. Antagonism of these receptors leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the peripheral vasculature and prostate gland. Prazosin has also been used in conjunction with cardiac glycosides and diuretics in the management of severe congestive heart failure. It has also been used alone or in combination with beta-blockers in the preoperative management of signs and symptoms of pheochromocytoma.

Source: Drug Bank

Indication

For treatment of hypertension, symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, and severe congestive heart failure. May also be used alone or in combination with beta-blockers in the preoperative management of signs and symptoms of pheochromocytoma.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

Prazosin acts by inhibiting the postsynaptic alpha(1)-adrenoceptors on vascular smooth muscle. This inhibits the vasoconstrictor effect of circulating and locally released catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine), resulting in peripheral vasodilation.

Source: Drug Bank

Pharmacology

Prazosin is an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent used to treat hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Accordingly, Prazosin is a selective inhibitor of the alpha1 subtype of alpha adrenergic receptors. In the human prostate, Prazosin antagonizes phenylephrine (alpha1 agonist)-induced contractions, in vitro, and binds with high affinity to the alpha1c adrenoceptor, which is thought to be the predominant functional type in the prostate. Studies in normal human subjects have shown that Prazosin competitively antagonized the pressor effects of phenylephrine (an alpha1 agonist) and the systolic pressor effect of norepinephrine. The antihypertensive effect of Prazosin results from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and the parent compound Prazosin is primarily responsible for the antihypertensive activity.

Source: Drug Bank

Food Interaction

Avoid alcohol.|Take without regard to meals.|Avoid natural licorice.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity

Biotransformation

Primarily hepatic. Several metabolites have been identified in humans and animals (6- O demethyl, 7 O demethyl, 21-piperazinyl-4-amino-6, 7-dimethoxyquinazoline, 2,4-diamino-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline).

Source: Drug Bank

Protein Binding

97%

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption

Well-absorbed from gastrointestinal tract; bioavailability is variable (50 to 85%).

Source: Drug Bank

Half-Life

2-3 hours

Source: Drug Bank

Route of Elimination

Animal studies indicate that prazosin hydrochloride is extensively metabolized, primarily by demethylation and conjugation, and excreted mainly via bile and feces. Less extensive human studies suggest similar metabolism and excretion in man.

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula

C19H21N5O4

Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES

COc1cc2c(cc1OC)nc(nc2N)N3CCN(CC3)C(=O)c4ccco4

Source: OpenEye

Canonical SMILES

COC1=C(OC)C=C2C(N)=NC(=NC2=C1)N1CCN(CC1)C(=O)C1=CC=CO1

Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight

383.4011

Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight

383.159354185

Source: Drug Bank

Genes that are associated with this drug in PharmGKB's database based on (1) variant annotations, (2) literature review, (3) pathways or (4) information automatically retrieved from DrugBank, depending on the "evidence" and "source" listed below.

Curated Information ?

EvidenceGene
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA VA No VIP available No VIP available
ABCB1

Drug Targets

Gene Description
ADRA1A (source: Drug Bank)
ADRA1B (source: Drug Bank)
ADRA1D (source: Drug Bank)
KCNH2 (source: Drug Bank)
KCNH6 (source: Drug Bank)
KCNH7 (source: Drug Bank)

Drug Interactions

Drug Description
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Prazosin increases the effect of digoxin (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Prazosin increases the effect of digoxin (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
acebutolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
acebutolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
atenolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
atenolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
betaxolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
betaxolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
bevantolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
bevantolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
bisoprolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
bisoprolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
carteolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
carteolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
carvedilol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
carvedilol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
digoxin Prazosin increases the effect of digoxin (source: Drug Bank)
digoxin Prazosin increases the effect of digoxin (source: Drug Bank)
esmolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
esmolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
labetalol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
labetalol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
metoprolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
metoprolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
nadolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
nadolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
oxprenolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
oxprenolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
penbutolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
penbutolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
pindolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
pindolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
practolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
practolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
propranolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
propranolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
sotalol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
sotalol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
tadalafil Risk of significant hypotension with this association (source: Drug Bank)
tadalafil Risk of significant hypotension with this association (source: Drug Bank)
timolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
timolol Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
verapamil Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
verapamil Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Tadalafil may enhance the hypotensive effect of Prazosin. Monitor for hypotension during concomitant therapy. (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Concomitant use of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, Tamsulosin and Prazosin, may result in additive antihypertensive effects. Combination therapy is not recommended. (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Concomitant use of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, Tamsulosin and Prazosin, may result in additive antihypertensive effects. Combination therapy is not recommended. (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Risk of hypotension at the beginning of therapy (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Additive hypotensive effect. Monitor antihypertensive therapy during concomitant use. (source: Drug Bank)
prazosin Additive hypotensive effects of the PDE5 inhibitor, Vardenafil, and alpha1-blocker, Prazosin, may occur. Monitor for hypotension during concomitant therapy. (source: Drug Bank)

Relationships from National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT)

May Treat
Contraindicated With

Publications related to prazosin: 2

No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Effects of norepinephrine on alpha-subtype receptors in the feline pulmonary vascular bed. Critical care medicine. 2004. Kaye Alan D, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA VA No VIP available No VIP available
Functional characterization of coding polymorphisms in the human MDR1 gene using a vaccinia virus expression system. Molecular pharmacology. 2002. Kimchi-Sarfaty Chava, et al. PubMed

LinkOuts

Web Resource:
Wikipedia
National Drug Code Directory:
0069-4310-71
DrugBank:
DB00457
ChEBI:
8364
KEGG Compound:
C07368
PubChem Compound:
4893
PubChem Substance:
46508594
9572
IUPHAR Ligand:
503
Drugs Product Database (DPD):
1910302
BindingDB:
29568
ChemSpider:
4724
Therapeutic Targets Database:
DAP000300
FDA Drug Label at DailyMed:
36c4da56-502e-4da1-acf7-8e81ee453dcc

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention prazosin and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

Common Searches

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.