Drug/Small Molecule:
pimozide

PharmGKB contains no dosing guidelines for this drug/small molecule. To report known genotype-based dosing guidelines, or if you are interested in developing guidelines, click here.

PharmGKB gathers information regarding PGx on FDA drug labels from the FDA's "Table of Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers in Drug Labels", and from FDA-approved FDA and EMA-approved (European Medicines Agency) EMA labels brought to our attention. Excerpts from the label and downloadable highlighted label PDFs are manually curated by PharmGKB.

Please note that some drugs may have been removed from or added to the FDA's "Table of Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers in Drug Labels" without our knowledge. We periodically check the table for additions to this table and update PharmGKB accordingly.

There is currently no such list for European drug labels - we are working with the EMA to establish a list of European Public Assessment Reports (EPAR)s that contain PGx information. We are constructing this list by initially searching for drugs for which we have PGx-containing FDA drug labels - of these 44 EMA EPARs were identified and are being curated for pgx information.

We welcome any information regarding drug labels containing PGx information approved by the FDA, EMA or other Medicine Agencies around the world - please contact feedback.


last updated 10/25/2013

FDA Label for pimozide and CYP2D6

This label is on the FDA Biomarker List
Genetic testing required

Summary

CYP2D6 genotyping should be performed at doses above 0.05mg/kg/day in children or above 4 mg/day in adults. In poor CYP2D6 metabolizers, pimozide doses should not exceed 0.05mg/kg/day in children or 4 mg/day in adults and doses should not be increased earlier than 14 days.

Annotation

PGx information can be found in the Warnings, Precautions, Contraindications and Dosage and Administration label sections.

Excerpts from the pimozine (Orap) label:

Individuals with genetic variations resulting in poor CYP2D6 metabolism (approximately 5 to 10% of the population) exhibit higher pimozide concentrations than extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers. The concentrations observed in poor CYP 2D6 metabolizers are similar to those seen with strong CYP2D6 inhibitors such as paroxetine. The time to achieve steady state pimozide concentrations is expected to be longer (approximately 2 weeks) in poor CYP2D6 metabolizers because of the prolonged half-life. Alternative dosing strategies are recommended in patients who are genetically poor CYP2D6 metabolizers.

In children: At doses above 0.05mg/kg/day, CYP2D6 genotyping should be performed. In poor CYP2D6 metabolizers, ORAP doses should not exceed 0.05mg/kg/day, and doses should not be increased earlier than 14 days.
In adults: At doses above 4 mg/day, CYP2D6 genotyping should be performed. In poor CYP2D6 metabolizers, ORAP doses should not exceed 4 mg/day, and doses should not be increased earlier than 14 days.

For the complete drug label text with sections containing pharmacogenetic information highlighted, see the pimozine (Orap) drug label.

*Disclaimer: The contents of this page have not been endorsed by the FDA and are the sole responsibility of PharmGKB.

Full label available at DailyMed

Genes and/or phenotypes found in this label

  • congenital long QT syndrome
    • Contraindications section
    • source: PHONT
  • Death, Sudden, Cardiac
    • Contraindications section, Warnings section
    • source: PHONT
  • Long QT Syndrome
    • Contraindications section
    • source: PHONT
  • Neutropenia
    • Precautions section
    • source: FDA Label
  • tardive dyskinesia
    • Warnings section, Adverse reactions section
    • source: FDA Label
  • CYP1A2
    • Drug interactions section, Clinical pharmacology section, metabolism/PK
    • source: FDA Label
  • CYP2D6
    • Dosage & administration section, Contraindications section, Drug interactions section, Clinical pharmacology section, Precautions section, dosage, metabolism/PK
    • source: FDA Label
  • CYP3A4
    • Contraindications section, Drug interactions section, Clinical pharmacology section, Precautions section, metabolism/PK
    • source: FDA Label

PharmGKB contains no Clinical Variants that meet the highest level of criteria.

To see more Clinical Variants with lower levels of criteria, click the button at the bottom of the page.

Disclaimer: The PharmGKB's clinical annotations reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and peer-reviewed literature available at the time they are written and are intended only to assist clinicians in decision-making and to identify questions for further research. New evidence may have emerged since the time an annotation was submitted to the PharmGKB. The annotations are limited in scope and are not applicable to interventions or diseases that are not specifically identified.

The annotations do not account for individual variations among patients, and cannot be considered inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of other treatments. It remains the responsibility of the health-care provider to determine the best course of treatment for a patient. Adherence to any guideline is voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding its application to be made solely by the clinician and the patient. PharmGKB assumes no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the PharmGKB clinical annotations, or for any errors or omissions.

? = Mouse-over for quick help

This is a non-comprehensive list of genetic tests with pharmacogenetics relevance, typically submitted by the manufacturer and manually curated by PharmGKB. The information listed is provided for educational purposes only and does not constitute an endorsement of any listed test or manufacturer.

A more complete listing of genetic tests is found at the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).

PGx Test Variants Assayed Gene?

The table below contains information about pharmacogenomic variants on PharmGKB. Please follow the link in the "Variant" column for more information about a particular variant. Each link in the "Variant" column leads to the corresponding PharmGKB Variant Page. The Variant Page contains summary data, including PharmGKB manually curated information about variant-drug pairs based on individual PubMed publications. The PMIDs for these PubMed publications can be found on the Variant Page.

The tags in the first column of the table indicate what type of information can be found on the corresponding Variant Page.

Links in the "Gene" column lead to PharmGKB Gene Pages.

Gene ? Variant?
(138)
Alternate Names / Tag SNPs ? Drugs ? Alleles ?
(+ chr strand)
Function ? Amino Acid?
Translation
No VIP available CA No VIP available CYP2D6 *1 N/A N/A N/A
No VIP available CA No VIP available CYP2D6 *4 N/A N/A N/A
No VIP available No Clinical Annotations available VA
CYP2D6 poor metabolizer N/A N/A N/A
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs776746 12083G>A, 219-237G>A, 321-1G>A, 37303382C>T, 581-237G>A, 689-1G>A, 99270539C>T, CYP3A5*1, CYP3A5*3, CYP3A5*3C, CYP3A5:6986A>G, g.6986A>G, intron 3 splicing defect, rs776746 A>G
C > T
Acceptor
Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 138
2D structure from PubChem
provided by PubChem

Overview

Generic Names
  • Pimozida [INN-Spanish]
  • Pimozidum [INN-Latin]
Trade Names
  • Halomonth
  • Neoperidole
  • Opiran
  • Orap
Brand Mixture Names

PharmGKB Accession Id:
PA450965

Description

A diphenylbutylpiperidine that is effective as an antipsychotic agent and as an alternative to haloperidol for the suppression of vocal and motor tics in patients with Tourette syndrome. Although the precise mechanism of action is unknown, blockade of postsynaptic dopamine receptors has been postulated. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p403)

Source: Drug Bank

Indication

Used for the suppression of motor and phonic tics in patients with Tourette's Disorder who have failed to respond satisfactorily to standard treatment.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

The ability of pimozide to suppress motor and phonic tics in Tourette's Disorder is thought to be primarily a function of its dopaminergic blocking activity. Pimozide binds and inhibits the dopamine D2 receptor in the CNS.

Source: Drug Bank

Pharmacology

Pimozide is an orally active antipsychotic drug product which shares with other antipsychotics the ability to blockade dopaminergic receptors on neurons in the central nervous system. However, receptor blockade is often accompanied by a series of secondary alterations in central dopamine metabolism and function which may contribute to both pimozide's therapeutic and untoward effects. In addition, pimozide, in common with other antipsychotic drugs, has various effects on other central nervous system receptor systems which are not fully characterized. Pimozide also has less potential for inducing sedation and hypotension as it has more specific dopamine receptor blocking activity than other neuroleptic agents (and is therefore a suitable alternative to haloperidol).

Source: Drug Bank

Food Interaction

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice should be avoided throughout treatment. Grapefruit can increase serum levels of this product.|Take without regard to meals.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity

Biotransformation

Notable first-pass metabolism in the liver, primarily by N-dealkylation via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP3A and CYP1A2 (and possibly CYP2D6). The activity of the two major metabolites has not been determined.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption

Greater than 50% absorption after oral administration. Serum peak appears 6-8 hours post ingestion.

Source: Drug Bank

Half-Life

29 +/- 10 hours (single-dose study of healthy volunteers).

Source: Drug Bank

Toxicity

LD 50 = 1100 mg/kg (rat, oral), 228 mg/kg (mouse, oral)

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula

C28H29F2N3O

Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES

c1ccc2c(c1)[nH]c(=O)n2C3CCN(CC3)CCCC(c4ccc(cc4)F)c5ccc(cc5)F

Source: OpenEye

Canonical SMILES

FC1=CC=C(C=C1)C(CCCN1CCC(CC1)N1C(=O)NC2=CC=CC=C12)C1=CC=C(F)C=C1

Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight

461.5462

Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight

461.227868975

Source: Drug Bank

PharmGKB Curated Pathways

Pathways created internally by PharmGKB based primarily on literature evidence.

  1. Antiarrhythmic Pathway, Pharmacodynamics
    Pharmacodynamic pathway of antiarrhythmic drugs in a stylized cardiac myocyte.

External Pathways

Links to non-PharmGKB pathways.

PharmGKB contains no links to external pathways for this drug. To report a pathway, click here.

Genes that are associated with this drug in PharmGKB's database based on (1) variant annotations, (2) literature review, (3) pathways or (4) information automatically retrieved from DrugBank, depending on the "evidence" and "source" listed below.

Curated Information ?

Drug Targets

Gene Description
CACNA1G (source: Drug Bank)
CALM1 (source: Drug Bank)
CALM3 (source: Drug Bank)
DRD2 (source: Drug Bank)
DRD3 (source: Drug Bank)
KCNH2 (source: Drug Bank)
OPRD1 (source: Drug Bank)

Drug Interactions

Drug Description
pimozide Increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The protease inhibitor increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The protease inhibitor, atazanavir, may increase the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide This SSRI increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide This SSRI, citalopram, increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The SSRI increases the effect of the beta-blocker (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Amprenavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Amprenavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The protease inhibitor increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The protease inhibitor, indinavir, may increase the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Nefazodone increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Nefazodone increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Nelfinavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Nelfinavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
amprenavir Amprenavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
amprenavir Amprenavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
aprepitant Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
aprepitant Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
atazanavir The protease inhibitor increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
atazanavir The protease inhibitor, atazanavir, may increase the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
citalopram The SSRI increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
citalopram The SSRI, citalopram, increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
clarithromycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
clarithromycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
donepezil Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
donepezil Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
erythromycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
erythromycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
escitalopram The SSRI increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
escitalopram The SSRI, escitalopram, increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
fluconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
fluconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
fosamprenavir Amprenavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
fosamprenavir Amprenavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
galantamine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
galantamine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
imatinib Imatinib increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
imatinib Imatinib increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
indinavir The protease inhibitor increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
indinavir The protease inhibitor, indinavir, may increase the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
itraconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
itraconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
josamycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
josamycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
ketoconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
ketoconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
mesoridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
mesoridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
nefazodone increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
nefazodone increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
nelfinavir Nelfinavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
nelfinavir Nelfinavir increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
paroxetine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity/arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
paroxetine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity/arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
posaconazole Contraindicated co-administration (source: Drug Bank)
posaconazole Contraindicated co-administration (source: Drug Bank)
ritonavir The protease inhibitor increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
ritonavir The protease inhibitor, ritonavir, may increase the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
rivastigmine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
rivastigmine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
saquinavir The protease inhibitor increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
saquinavir The protease inhibitor, saquinavir, may increase the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
sertraline The SSRI increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide (source: Drug Bank)
sertraline The SSRI, sertraline, increases the effect and toxicity of pimozide. (source: Drug Bank)
telithromycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
telithromycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
thioridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
thioridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
troleandomycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
troleandomycin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
voriconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
voriconazole Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
zileuton Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
zileuton Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
ziprasidone Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
ziprasidone Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The therapeutic effects of the central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, Tacrine, and/or the anticholinergic, Pimozide, may be reduced due to antagonism. The interaction may be beneficial when the anticholinergic action is a side effect. Monitor for decreased efficacy of both agents. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide The therapeutic effects of the central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI), Tacrine, and/or the anticholinergic/antipsychotic, Pimozide, may be reduced due to antagonism. This interaction may be beneficial when the anticholinergic action is a side effect. AChEIs may also augment the central neurotoxic effect of antipsychotics. Monitor for extrapyramidal symptoms and decreased efficacy of both agents. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Additive QTc-prolongation may occur increasing the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias. Concomitant therapy should be used with caution. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Telithromycin may reduce clearance of Pimozide. Concomitant therapy is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide May cause dopamine deficiency. Monitor for Tetrabenazine adverse effects. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide May cause additive QTc-prolonging effects. Increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Consider alternate therapy. Thorough risk:benefit assessment is required prior to co-administration. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide May cause additive QTc-prolonging effects. Increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Consider alternate therapy. Thorough risk:benefit assessment is required prior to co-administration. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Tipranavir, co-administered with Ritonavir, may increase the plasma concentration of Pimozide. Concomitant therapy is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Additive QTc-prolongation may occur, increasing the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias. Consider alternate therapy. A thorough risk:benefit assessment is required prior to co-administration. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Trimethobenzamide and Pimozide, two anticholinergics, may cause additive anticholinergic effects and enhance their adverse/toxic effects. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic effects. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Additive QTc-prolongation may occur, increasing the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias. Concomitant therapy should be used with caution. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Triprolidine and Pimozide, two anticholinergics, may cause additive anticholinergic effects and enhance their adverse/toxic effects. Additive CNS depressant effects may also occur. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic and CNS depressant effects. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Triprolidine and Pimozide, two anticholinergics, may cause additive anticholinergic effects and enhance their adverse/toxic effects. Additive CNS depressant effects may also occur. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic and CNS depressant effects. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Trospium and Pimozide, two anticholinergics, may cause additive anticholinergic effects and enhanced adverse/toxic effects. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic effects. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Voriconazole, a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor, may increase the serum concentration of pimozide by decreasing its metabolism. Increased risk of QTc prolongation and development arrhythmias. Concomitant use is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Additive QTc prolongation may occur. Concomitant therapy is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Additive QTc-prolonging effects may increase the risk of severe arrhythmias. Concomitant therapy is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)
pimozide Additive QTc-prolonging effects increases risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Concomitant therapy is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)

Curated Information ?

Relationships from National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT)

May Treat
Contraindicated With

Publications related to pimozide: 8

No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Challenges in pharmacogenetics. European journal of clinical pharmacology. 2013. Cascorbi Ingolf, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
The AmpliChip® CYP450 test and response to treatment in schizophrenia and obsessive compulsive disorder: a pilot study and focus on cases with abnormal CYP2D6 drug metabolism. Genetic testing and molecular biomarkers. 2012. Müller Daniel J, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
PharmGKB summary: very important pharmacogene information for CYP3A5. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2012. Lamba Jatinder, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
KCNH2 pharmacogenomics summary. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2010. Oshiro Connie, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Drug-induced long QT syndrome. Pharmacological reviews. 2010. Kannankeril Prince, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Coprescription of tamoxifen and medications that inhibit CYP2D6. Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 2010. Sideras Kostandinos, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
A comparison of the receptor binding and HERG channel affinities for a series of antipsychotic drugs. European journal of pharmacology. 2002. Kongsamut Sathapana, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA VA No VIP available No VIP available
Effect of clarithromycin on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pimozide in healthy poor and extensive metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 1999. Desta Z, et al. PubMed

LinkOuts

Web Resource:
Wikipedia
DrugBank:
DB01100
ChEBI:
8212
KEGG Compound:
C07566
KEGG Drug:
D00560
PubChem Compound:
16362
PubChem Substance:
46507096
9769
IUPHAR Ligand:
90
Drugs Product Database (DPD):
573817
ChemSpider:
15520
Therapeutic Targets Database:
DAP000316

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention pimozide and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.