Drug/Small Molecule:
ibuprofen

PharmGKB contains no dosing guidelines for this drug/small molecule. To report known genotype-based dosing guidelines, or if you are interested in developing guidelines, click here.

PharmGKB has no annotated drug labels with pharmacogenomic information for this drug/small molecule. If you know of a drug label with PGx, send us a message.

Links to Unannotated Labels

These links are to labels associated with ibuprofen that have not been annotated by PharmGKB.

  1. DailyMed - DrugLabel PA166105158

PharmGKB contains no Clinical Variants that meet the highest level of criteria.

To see more Clinical Variants with lower levels of criteria, click the button at the bottom of the page.

Disclaimer: The PharmGKB's clinical annotations reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and peer-reviewed literature available at the time they are written and are intended only to assist clinicians in decision-making and to identify questions for further research. New evidence may have emerged since the time an annotation was submitted to the PharmGKB. The annotations are limited in scope and are not applicable to interventions or diseases that are not specifically identified.

The annotations do not account for individual variations among patients, and cannot be considered inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of other treatments. It remains the responsibility of the health-care provider to determine the best course of treatment for a patient. Adherence to any guideline is voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding its application to be made solely by the clinician and the patient. PharmGKB assumes no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the PharmGKB clinical annotations, or for any errors or omissions.

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This is a non-comprehensive list of genetic tests with pharmacogenetics relevance, typically submitted by the manufacturer and manually curated by PharmGKB. The information listed is provided for educational purposes only and does not constitute an endorsement of any listed test or manufacturer.

A more complete listing of genetic tests is found at the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).

PGx Test Variants Assayed Gene?

The table below contains information about pharmacogenomic variants on PharmGKB. Please follow the link in the "Variant" column for more information about a particular variant. Each link in the "Variant" column leads to the corresponding PharmGKB Variant Page. The Variant Page contains summary data, including PharmGKB manually curated information about variant-drug pairs based on individual PubMed publications. The PMIDs for these PubMed publications can be found on the Variant Page.

The tags in the first column of the table indicate what type of information can be found on the corresponding Variant Page.

Links in the "Gene" column lead to PharmGKB Gene Pages.

Gene ? Variant?
(138)
Alternate Names / Tag SNPs ? Drugs ? Alleles ?
(+ chr strand)
Function ? Amino Acid?
Translation
No VIP available No VIP available VA CYP2C8 *1A N/A N/A N/A
No VIP available No VIP available VA CYP2C8 *2 N/A N/A N/A
No VIP available No VIP available VA CYP2C8 *3 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available VA CYP2C8 *4 N/A N/A N/A
No VIP available No VIP available VA CYP2C9 *1 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available VA CYP2C9 *2 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available VA CYP2C9 *3 N/A N/A N/A
rs1057910 1075A>C, 47545517A>C, 47639A>C, 96741053A>C, CYP2C9*3, CYP2C9*3:Ile359Leu, CYP2C9: I359L, CYP2C9:359Ile>Leu, CYP2C9:Ile359Leu, Ile359Leu, mRNA 11A>C
A > C
Missense
Ile359Leu
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs1058930 16136C>G, 47622583G>C, 486C>G, 582C>G, 792C>G, 96818119G>C, C792G, CYP2C8: I264M, Ile162Met, Ile194Met, Ile264Met
G > C
Missense
Ile194Met
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs1799853 430C>T, 47506511C>T, 8633C>T, 96702047C>T, Arg144Cys, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9:144Arg>Cys, CYP2C9:Arg144Cys, mRNA 455C>T
C > T
Missense
Arg144Cys
rs20417 -899G>C, 186650321C>G, 38138963C>G, 4239G>C, COX-2 G-765C, PTGS2:-765G>C
C > G
5' Flanking
Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 138
2D structure from PubChem
provided by PubChem

Overview

Generic Names
  • Ibuprophen
  • P-Isobutylhydratropic Acid
  • Para-Isobutylhydratropic Acid
Trade Names
  • Actiprofen
  • Adran
  • Advil
  • Advil Liqui-Gels
  • Amersol
  • Amibufen
  • Anco
  • Andran
  • Anflagen
  • Apo-Ibuprofen
  • Apsifen
  • Apsifen-F
  • Artril 300
  • Bluton
  • Brufanic
  • Brufen
  • Brufort
  • Buburone
  • Butylenin
  • Cap-Profen
  • Children's Advil
  • Children's Elixsure
  • Children's Ibuprofen
  • Children's Motrin
  • Codral
  • Dolgin
  • Dolgirid
  • Dolgit
  • Dolo-Dolgit
  • Dolocyl
  • Ebufac
  • Emodin
  • Epobron
  • Femadon
  • Fenbid Spansule
  • Haltran
  • Ibu
  • Ibu-Attritin
  • Ibu-Slo
  • Ibu-Tab
  • Ibu-Tab 200
  • Ibufen
  • Ibumetin
  • Ibuprin
  • Ibuprocin
  • Ibuprohm
  • Ibutid
  • Ifen
  • Inabrin
  • Inoven
  • Junior Strength Advil
  • Junior Strength Ibuprofen
  • Junior Strength Motrin
  • Lamidon
  • Lebrufen
  • Lidifen
  • Liptan
  • Medipren
  • Midol
  • Midol 200
  • Motrin
  • Mynosedin
  • Napacetin
  • NeoProfen
  • Nobfelon
  • Nobfen
  • Nobgen
  • Novogent N
  • Novoprofen
  • Nuprin
  • Nurofen
  • Pantrop
  • Paxofen
  • Pedia-Profen
  • Pediaprofen
  • Pediatric Advil
  • Profen
  • Rafen
  • Rebugen
  • Roidenin
  • Rufen
  • Seclodin
  • Suspren
  • Tab-Profen
  • Tabalon
  • Trendar
  • Urem
Brand Mixture Names
  • Dimetapp Cold and Sinus Caplets (Ibuprofen + Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride)
  • Dristan Sinus Caplets (Ibuprofen + Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride)

PharmGKB Accession Id:
PA449957

Description

Ibuprofen, a propionic acid derivative, is a prototypical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAIA) with analgesic and antipyretic properties.

Source: Drug Bank

Indication

For symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. May be used to treat mild to moderate pain and for the management of dysmenorrhea. May be used to reduce fever. Has been used with some success for treating ankylosing spondylitis, gout and psoriatic arthritis. May reduce pain, fever and inflammation of pericarditis. May be used IV with opiates to relieve moderate to severe pain. Ibuprofen lysine may be used IV to treat patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature neonates.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

The exact mechanism of action of ibuprofen is unknown. Ibuprofen is a non-selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, an enzyme invovled in prostaglandin synthesis via the arachidonic acid pathway. Its pharmacological effects are believed to be due to inhibition cylooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which decreases the synthesis of prostaglandins involved in mediating inflammation, pain, fever and swelling. Antipyretic effects may be due to action on the hypothalamus, resulting in an increased peripheral blood flow, vasodilation, and subsequent heat dissipation. Inhibition of COX-1 is thought to cause some of the side effects of ibuprofen including GI ulceration. Ibuprofen is administered as a racemic mixture. The R-enantiomer undergoes extensive interconversion to the S-enantiomer in vivo. The S-enantiomer is believed to be the more pharmacologically active enantiomer.

Source: Drug Bank

Pharmacology

Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAIA) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with analgesic and antipyretic properties. Ibuprofen has pharmacologic actions similar to those of other prototypical NSAIAs, which are thought to act through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis.

Source: Drug Bank

Food Interaction

Avoid alcohol.|Take with food to reduce gastric irritation.|Food delays the time to reach peak plasma concentrations by 30-60 minutes and reduces peak plasma concentrations by 30-50%. Extent of absorption is unaffected.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity

Biotransformation

R-enanatiomer undergoes extensive enantiomeric conversion (53-65%) to the more active S-enantiomer in vivo. Metablized by oxidation to 2 inactive metabolites: ()2[4´(2-hydroxy-2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propionic acid and ()2[4´-(2-carboxypropyl)phenyl]propionic acid. Very small amounts of 1-hydroxyibuprofen and 3-hydroxyibuprofen have been recovered from urine. Cytochrome P450 2C9 is the major catalyst in the formation of oxidative metabolites. Oxidative metabolites may be conjugated to glucuronide prior to excretion.

Source: Drug Bank

Protein Binding

90-99% to whole human plasma and site II of purified albumin, binding appears to be saturable and becomes non-linear at concentrations exceeding 20 mcg/ml.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption

~ 80% absorbed from GI tract
<p>Time to reach peak plasma concentration = 47 minutes (suspension), 62 minutes (chewable tablets), 120 minutes (conventional tablets)</p>

Source: Drug Bank

Half-Life

2-4 hours

Source: Drug Bank

Toxicity

<p>Side effects: May cause peripheral edema and fluid retention. Use caution in patients with congestive heart failure or severe uncontrolled hypertension. May cause dyspepsia, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, constipation, stomatitis, flatulence, bloating, epigastric pain, and abdominal pain. Peptic ulcer and GI bleeding have been reported. May also cause dizziness, headache and nervousness. Acute renal failure accompanied by acute tubular necrosis has been reported.
<p>Most common symptoms of overdose are abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, lethargy, vertigo, drowsiness (somnolence), dizziness and insomnia. Other symptoms of overdose include headache, loss of consciousness, tinnitus, CNS depression, convulsions and seizures. May rarely cause metabolic acidosis, abnormal hepatic function, hyperkalemia, renal failure, dyspnea, respiratory depression, coma, acute renal failure, and apnea (primarily in very young pediatric patients).</p>
<p>LD 50=1255mg/kg(orally in mice)</p>

Source: Drug Bank

Route of Elimination

Ibuprofen is rapidly metabolized and eliminated in the urine.

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula

C13H18O2

Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES

CC(C)Cc1ccc(cc1)C(C)C(=O)O

Source: OpenEye

Canonical SMILES

CC(C)CC1=CC=C(C=C1)C(C)C(O)=O

Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight

206.2808

Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight

206.13067982

Source: Drug Bank

PharmGKB Curated Pathways

Pathways created internally by PharmGKB based primarily on literature evidence.

  1. Ibuprofen Pathway, Pharmacokinetics
    Stylized diagram of metabolism and transport of ibuprofen in the liver and kidney.

External Pathways

Links to non-PharmGKB pathways.

PharmGKB contains no links to external pathways for this drug. To report a pathway, click here.

Genes that are associated with this drug in PharmGKB's database based on (1) variant annotations, (2) literature review, (3) pathways or (4) information automatically retrieved from DrugBank, depending on the "evidence" and "source" listed below.

Curated Information ?

Drug Targets

Gene Description
ALB (source: Drug Bank)
PTGS1 (source: Drug Bank)
PTGS2 (source: Drug Bank)

Curated Information ?

EvidenceDrug
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available PW
methotrexate
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available PW
pravastatin

Drug Interactions

Drug Description
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen reduces ASA cardioprotective effects (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Concomitant therapy of the NSAID, ketoprofen, and acetylsalicylic acid may result in additive adverse/toxic effects (e.g. GI bleeding). The NSAID may also limit the cardioprotective effect of acetylsalicylic acid. Occasional concomitant use may not cause clinically significant problems, but regular, frequent concomitant therapy is not recommended. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effects of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID, ibuprofen, decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effects of the loop diuretic, bumetanide. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Monitor for nephrotoxicity (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Monitor for nephrotoxicity (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effects of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the diuretic and antihypertensive effects of the loop diuretic, ethacrynic acid. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effects of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the diuretic and antihypertensive effects of the loop diuretic, furosemide. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Additive anticoagulant/antiplatelet effects may increase bleed risk. Concomitant therapy should be avoided. (source: Drug Bank)
acebutolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
acebutolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
acenocoumarol The NSAID increases the anticoagulant effect (source: Drug Bank)
acenocoumarol The NSAID, ibuprofen, may increase the anticoagulant effect of acenocoumarol. (source: Drug Bank)
alendronate Increased risk of gastric toxicity (source: Drug Bank)
alendronate Increased risk of gastric toxicity (source: Drug Bank)
anisindione The NSAID, ibuprofen, may increase the anticoagulant effect of anisindione. (source: Drug Bank)
aspirin Ibuprofen reduces ASA cardioprotective effects (source: Drug Bank)
atenolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
atenolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
betaxolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
betaxolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
bevantolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
bisoprolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
bisoprolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
bumetanide The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
bumetanide The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic, bumetanide. (source: Drug Bank)
carteolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
carvedilol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
carvedilol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
cyclosporine Monitor for nephrotoxicity (source: Drug Bank)
cyclosporine Monitor for nephrotoxicity (source: Drug Bank)
dicumarol The NSAID increases the anticoagulant effect (source: Drug Bank)
dicumarol The NSAID, ibuprofen, may increase the anticoagulant effect of dicumarol. (source: Drug Bank)
esmolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
esmolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ethacrynic acid The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
furosemide The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
furosemide The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic, furosemide. (source: Drug Bank)
labetalol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
lithium The NSAID increases serum levels of lithium (source: Drug Bank)
lithium The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the renal excretion of lithium. Increased risk of lithium toxicity. (source: Drug Bank)
methotrexate The NSAID increases the effect and toxicity of methotrexate (source: Drug Bank)
methotrexate The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the renal excretion of methotrexate. Increased risk of methotrexate toxicity. (source: Drug Bank)
metoprolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
metoprolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
nadolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
nadolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
oxprenolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
oxprenolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
penbutolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
pindolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
pindolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
practolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
propranolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
propranolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
sotalol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
sotalol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
timolol Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
torasemide The NSAID decreases the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic (source: Drug Bank)
torasemide The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the diuretic and antihypertensive effect of the loop diuretic, torasemide. (source: Drug Bank)
warfarin The NSAID increases the anticoagulant effect (source: Drug Bank)
warfarin The NSAID, ibuprofen, may increase the anticoagulant effect of warfarin. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID increases serum levels of lithium (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the renal excretion of lithium. Increased risk of lithium toxicity. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID increases the effect and toxicity of methotrexate (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID, ibuprofen, may decrease the renal excretion of methotrexate. Increased risk of methotrexate toxicity. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen may reduce clearance rate of Tamoxifen. Monitor for changes in therapeutic/adverse effects of Tamoxifen if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen may reduce clearance rate of Tamoxifen. Monitor for changes in therapeutic/adverse effects of Tamoxifen if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins. The NSAID, Ibuprofen, may also antagonize the antihypertensive effect of Timolol. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Risk of inhibition of renal prostaglandins. The NSAID, Ibuprofen, may also antagonize the antihypertensive effect of Timolol. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen, a strong CYP2C9 inhibitor, may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in Tolbutamide therapeutic and adverse effects if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen, a strong CYP2C9 inhibitor, may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in Tolbutamide therapeutic and adverse effects if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen, a strong CYP2C9 inhibitor, may increase the serum concentration of Torasemide, a CYP2C9 substrate, by decreasing Torasemide metabolism and clearance. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in the therapeutic and adverse effects of Torasemide if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The NSAID, Ibuprofen, may reduce the antihypertensive effect of Trandolapril. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in Trandolapril efficacy if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The prostacyclin analogue, Treprostinil, may increase the risk of bleeding when combined with the NSAID, Ibuprofen. Monitor for increased bleeding during concomitant thearpy. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen The strong CYP2C9 inhibitor, Ibuprofen, may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Trimethoprim, a CYP2C9 substrate. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in therapeutic and adverse effects of Trimethoprim if Ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen, a strong CYP2C9 inhibitor, may increase the serum concentration of voriconazole by decreasing its metabolism. Monitor for changes in the therapeutic and adverse effects of voriconazole if ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
ibuprofen Ibuprofen, a strong CYP2C9 inhibitor, may decrease the metabolism of warfarin. The antiplatelet effect of ibuprofen may also increase the bleed risk associated with warfarin. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in the therapeutic and adverse effects of warfarin if ibuprofen is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)

Relationships from National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT)

May Treat
May Prevent
Contraindicated With

Publications related to ibuprofen: 23

No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
PharmGKB summary: very important pharmacogene information for cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, polypeptide 8. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2013. Aquilante Christina L, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Pharmacogenomics of acetylsalicylic acid and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents: clinical implications. European journal of clinical pharmacology. 2013. Yiannakopoulou Eugenia. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Influence of CYP2C8 polymorphisms on the hydroxylation metabolism of paclitaxel, repaglinide, and ibuprofen enantiomers in vitro. Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition. 2013. Yu Lushan, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Changes in the gene expression profile of gastric cancer cells in response to ibuprofen: a gene pathway analysis. The pharmacogenomics journal. 2010. Bonelli P, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Cytochrome P450 2C9-CYP2C9. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2010. Van Booven Derek, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Human CYP2C8: structure, substrate specificity, inhibitor selectivity, inducers and polymorphisms. Current drug metabolism. 2009. Lai Xin-Sheng, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Pharmacokinetic studies of enantiomers of ibuprofen and its chiral metabolites in humans with different variants of genes coding CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 isoenzymes. Xenobiotica; the fate of foreign compounds in biological systems. 2009. Karaźniewicz-Łada M, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Risk of myocardial infarction and death associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among healthy individuals: a nationwide cohort study. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2009. Fosbøl E L, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Genetically based impairment in CYP2C8- and CYP2C9-dependent NSAID metabolism as a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding: is a combination of pharmacogenomics and metabolomics required to improve personalized medicine?. Expert opinion on drug metabolism & toxicology. 2009. Agúndez José A G, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Functional pharmacogenetics/genomics of human cytochromes P450 involved in drug biotransformation. Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. 2008. Zanger Ulrich M, et al. PubMed
Influence of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of racemic and enantiomeric forms of ibuprofen in healthy volunteers. Pharmacological research : the official journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society. 2008. López-Rodríguez Rosario, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Modeling and simulation to support dose selection and clinical development of SC-75416, a selective COX-2 inhibitor for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2008. Kowalski K G, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Confirmation that cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) plays a minor role in (S)-(+)- and (R)-(-)-ibuprofen hydroxylation in vitro. Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals. 2008. Chang Shu-Ying, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Interaction of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 genotypes modifies the risk for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-related acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2008. Blanco Gerardo, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in normal tissues and in cancer. The AAPS journal. 2008. Ganapathy Vadivel, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available VA No VIP available No VIP available
Genetic susceptibility to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related gastroduodenal bleeding: role of cytochrome P450 2C9 polymorphisms. Gastroenterology. 2007. Pilotto Alberto, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA VA No VIP available No VIP available
Genetically mediated interindividual variation in analgesic responses to cyclooxygenase inhibitory drugs. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2006. Lee Yun-Sil, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Glucuronidation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: identifying the enzymes responsible in human liver microsomes. Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals. 2005. Kuehl Gwendolyn E, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
The effect of the cytochrome P450 CYP2C8 polymorphism on the disposition of (R)-ibuprofen enantiomer in healthy subjects. British journal of clinical pharmacology. 2005. Martínez Carmen, et al. PubMed
Interindividual variability in ibuprofen pharmacokinetics is related to interaction of cytochrome P450 2C8 and 2C9 amino acid polymorphisms. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2004. García-Martín Elena, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Characterization of methotrexate transport and its drug interactions with human organic anion transporters. The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics. 2002. Takeda Michio, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available VA No VIP available No VIP available
Enantiospecific effects of cytochrome P450 2C9 amino acid variants on ibuprofen pharmacokinetics and on the inhibition of cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2002. Kirchheiner Julia, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
[The biotransformation of NSAIDs: a common elimination site and drug interactions]. Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift. 1992. Leemann T, et al. PubMed

LinkOuts

Web Resource:
Wikipedia
National Drug Code Directory:
0182-8688-89
DrugBank:
DB01050
PDB:
IBP
ChEBI:
5855
KEGG Compound:
C01588
KEGG Drug:
D00126
PubChem Compound:
3672
PubChem Substance:
170047
46507255
Drugs Product Database (DPD):
636525
ChemSpider:
3544
HET:
IBP
Therapeutic Targets Database:
DAP000780
FDA Drug Label at DailyMed:
53ab35f8-e678-41c8-8313-ee6cc821dc3f

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention ibuprofen and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.