Drug/Small Molecule:
chlorpromazine

PharmGKB contains no dosing guidelines for this drug/small molecule. To report known genotype-based dosing guidelines, or if you are interested in developing guidelines, click here.

PharmGKB has no annotated drug labels with pharmacogenomic information for this drug/small molecule. If you know of a drug label with PGx, send us a message.

Links to Unannotated Labels

These links are to labels associated with chlorpromazine that have not been annotated by PharmGKB.

  1. DailyMed - DrugLabel PA166105090

PharmGKB contains no Clinical Variants that meet the highest level of criteria.

To see more Clinical Variants with lower levels of criteria, click the button at the bottom of the page.

Disclaimer: The PharmGKB's clinical annotations reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and peer-reviewed literature available at the time they are written and are intended only to assist clinicians in decision-making and to identify questions for further research. New evidence may have emerged since the time an annotation was submitted to the PharmGKB. The annotations are limited in scope and are not applicable to interventions or diseases that are not specifically identified.

The annotations do not account for individual variations among patients, and cannot be considered inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of other treatments. It remains the responsibility of the health-care provider to determine the best course of treatment for a patient. Adherence to any guideline is voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding its application to be made solely by the clinician and the patient. PharmGKB assumes no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the PharmGKB clinical annotations, or for any errors or omissions.

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This is a non-comprehensive list of genetic tests with pharmacogenetics relevance, typically submitted by the manufacturer and manually curated by PharmGKB. The information listed is provided for educational purposes only and does not constitute an endorsement of any listed test or manufacturer.

A more complete listing of genetic tests is found at the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).

PGx Test Variants Assayed Gene?

The table below contains information about pharmacogenomic variants on PharmGKB. Please follow the link in the "Variant" column for more information about a particular variant. Each link in the "Variant" column leads to the corresponding PharmGKB Variant Page. The Variant Page contains summary data, including PharmGKB manually curated information about variant-drug pairs based on individual PubMed publications. The PMIDs for these PubMed publications can be found on the Variant Page.

The tags in the first column of the table indicate what type of information can be found on the corresponding Variant Page.

Links in the "Gene" column lead to PharmGKB Gene Pages.

List of all chlorpromazine variant annotations

Gene ? Variant?
(142)
Alternate Names ? Drugs ? Alleles ?
(+ chr strand)
Function ? Amino Acid?
Translation
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *1 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *2 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *3 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *4 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *6 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *9 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *10 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *17 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *29 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No VIP available No VIP available CYP2D6 *41 N/A N/A N/A
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs1065852 100C>T, 21917263G>A, 42526694G>A, 5190C>T, CYP2D6:100C>T, Pro34Ser, part of CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*10
G > A
Missense
Pro34Ser
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs16947 21914512A>G, 42523943A>G, 733C>C, 7941C>C, 886C>C, Arg245=, Arg296=, CYP2D6:2850C>T
A > G
Not Available
rs1799732 -487_-486insC, 113346252_113346253insG, 16908668_16908669insG, 4749_4750insC, DRD2: -141C Ins/Del
- > G
5' Flanking
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs28371706 21916341G>A, 320C>T, 42525772G>A, 6112C>T, CYP2D6:1023 C>T, Thr107Ile
G > A
Missense
Thr107Ile
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs28371725 21914374C>T, 42523805C>T, 8079G>A, 832+39G>A, 985+39G>A, CYP2D6*41, CYP2D6:2988G>A, part of CYP2D6*41
C > T
Intronic
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs35742686 -1793delT, -1830delT, -1940delT, 23418678delT, 40+2664delT, 42128242delT, 50569delT, 50583delT, 598delA, 622delA, 6750delA, 775delA, Arg200Glyfs, Arg208Glyfs, Arg259Glyfs
T > -
Not Available
Arg208Gly
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs3892097 21915516C>T, 353-1G>A, 42524947C>T, 506-1G>A, 6937G>A, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6:1846G>A, part of CYP2D6*4
C > T
Acceptor
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs5030655 -1098delA, -1563delA, -951delA, -988delA, 23419520delA, 277delT, 353-140delT, 40+3506delA, 42129084delA, 454delT, 51411delA, 51425delA, 5908delT, CYP2D6*6, CYP2D6:1707 del T, Trp152Glyfs, Trp93Glyfs, part of CYP2D6*6
A > -
Not Available
Trp152Gly
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs5030656 21914745_21914747delCTT, 42524176_42524178delCTT, 688_690delAAG, 7706_7708delAAG, 841_843delAAG, Lys230del, Lys281del
CTT > -
CTT > TTC
Non-synonymous
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs59421388 1012G>A, 21914179C>T, 3271G>A, 42523610C>T, 8274G>A, 859G>A, CYP2D6: 3183G>A, Val287Met, Val338Met
G > T
G > C
Missense
Val287Met
VIP No Clinical Annotations available No Variant Annotations available
rs61736512 1747G>A, 21915703C>T, 353-188G>A, 406G>A, 42525134C>T, 6750G>A, CYP2D6: 1659G>A, Val136Met
G > T
G > C
Intronic
Val136Met
No VIP available CA VA
rs762551 -9-154C>A, 32035C>A, 45832474C>A, 75041917C>A, CYP1A2*1F, CYP1A2:734C>A
C > A
Intronic
Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 142
2D structure from PubChem
provided by PubChem

Overview

Generic Names
Trade Names
  • Chloropromazine
  • Chlorpromanyl
  • Chlorpromanyl-20
  • Chlorpromanyl-40
  • Chlorpromazine Hydrochloride Intensol
  • Largactil
  • Largactil Liquid
  • Largactil Oral Drops
  • Novo-Chlorpromazine
  • Thorazine
  • Thorazine Spansule
Brand Mixture Names

PharmGKB Accession Id:
PA448964

Description

The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class, chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking dopamine receptors. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup.

Source: Drug Bank

Indication

For the treatment of schizophrenia, control nausea and vomiting, For relief of restlessness and apprehension before surgery, adjunct in the treatment of tetanus, control the manifestations of the manic type of manic-depressive illness.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsysnaptic receptors -on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4 - different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side-effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism - controversial) and finally on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side-effects).
Additionally, Chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of Dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use).

Source: Drug Bank

Pharmacology

Chlorpromazine is a psychotropic agent indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia. It also exerts sedative and antiemetic activity. Chlorpromazine has actions at all levels of the central nervous system-primarily at subcortical levels-as well as on multiple organ systems. Chlorpromazine has strong antiadrenergic and weaker peripheral anticholinergic activity; ganglionic blocking action is relatively slight. It also possesses slight antihistaminic and antiserotonin activity.

Source: Drug Bank

Food Interaction

Avoid alcohol.|Take with food to reduce irritation.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity

Biotransformation

Extensively metabolized in the liver and kidneys. It is extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 isozymes CYP2D6 (major pathway), CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. Approximately 10 to 12 major metabolite have been identified. Hydroxylation at positions 3 and 7 of the phenothiazine nucleus and the N-dimethylaminopropyl side chain undergoes demethylation and is also metabolized to an N-oxide. In urine, 20% of chlopromazine and its metabolites are excreted unconjugated in the urine as unchanged drug, demonomethylchlorpromazine, dedimethylchlorpromazine, their sulfoxide metabolites, and chlorpromazine-N-oxide. The remaining 80% consists of conjugated metabolites, principally O-glucuronides and small amounts of ethereal sulfates of the mono- and dihydroxy-derivatives of chlorpromazine and their sulfoxide metabolites. The major metabolites are the monoglucuronide of N-dedimethylchlorpromazine and 7-hydroxychlorpromazine. Approximately 37% of the administered dose of chlorpromazine is excreted in urine.

Source: Drug Bank

Protein Binding

> 90% to plasma proteins, primarily albumin

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption

Readily absorbed from the GI tract. Bioavailability varies due to first-pass metabolism by the liver.

Source: Drug Bank

Half-Life

~ 30 hours

Source: Drug Bank

Toxicity

Agitation, coma, convulsions, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, dry mouth, extreme sleepiness, fever, intestinal blockage, irregular heart rate, low blood pressure, restlessness

Source: Drug Bank

Route of Elimination

Kidneys, ~ 37% excreted in urine

Source: Drug Bank

Volume of Distribution

  • 20 L/kg

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula

C17H19ClN2S

Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES

CN(C)CCCN1c2ccccc2Sc3c1cc(cc3)Cl

Source: OpenEye

Canonical SMILES

CN(C)CCCN1C2=CC=CC=C2SC2=C1C=C(Cl)C=C2

Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight

318.864

Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight

318.095747015

Source: Drug Bank

Genes that are associated with this drug in PharmGKB's database based on (1) variant annotations, (2) literature review, (3) pathways or (4) information automatically retrieved from DrugBank, depending on the "evidence" and "source" listed below.

Curated Information ?

Drug Targets

Gene Description
ADRA1A (source: Drug Bank)
ADRA1B (source: Drug Bank)
ALB (source: Drug Bank)
DRD1 (source: Drug Bank)
DRD2 (source: Drug Bank)
HTR1A (source: Drug Bank)
HTR2A (source: Drug Bank)

Drug Interactions

Drug Description
chlorpromazine The phenothiazine decreases the effect of bromocriptine (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The phenothiazine decreases the effect of bromocriptine (source: Drug Bank)
amphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
amphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
benzphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
benzphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
bromocriptine The phenothiazine decreases the effect of bromocriptine (source: Drug Bank)
bromocriptine The phenothiazine decreases the effect of bromocriptine (source: Drug Bank)
cisapride Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
cisapride Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
dexfenfluramine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
dexfenfluramine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
dextroamphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
dextroamphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
diethylpropion Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
diethylpropion Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
donepezil Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
donepezil Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
fenfluramine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
fenfluramine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
galantamine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
galantamine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
gatifloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
gatifloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
grepafloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
grepafloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
guanethidine The agent decreases the effect of guanethidine (source: Drug Bank)
guanethidine Chlorpromazine may decrease the effect of guanethidine. (source: Drug Bank)
levofloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
levofloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
mazindol Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
mazindol Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
meperidine Increased sedation and hypotension (source: Drug Bank)
meperidine Increased sedation and hypotension (source: Drug Bank)
mesoridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
mesoridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
methamphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
methamphetamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
metrizamide Increased risk of convulsions (source: Drug Bank)
metrizamide Increased risk of convulsions (source: Drug Bank)
phendimetrazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phendimetrazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increases psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phenmetrazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phenmetrazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phentermine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phentermine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phenylpropanolamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
phenylpropanolamine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
pindolol Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
pindolol Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
propranolol Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
propranolol Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
rivastigmine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
rivastigmine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
sparfloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
sparfloxacin Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
terfenadine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
terfenadine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
thioridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
thioridazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
ziprasidone Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
ziprasidone Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Possible antagonism of action (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The agent decreases the effect of guanethidine (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine may decrease the effect of guanethidine. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased sedation and hypotension (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased sedation and hypotension (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Decreased anorexic effect, may increase psychotic symptoms (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased effect of both drugs (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The therapeutic effects of the central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, Tacrine, and/or the anticholinergic, Chlorpromazine, may be reduced due to antagonism. The interaction may be beneficial when the anticholinergic action is a side effect. Monitor for decreased efficacy of both agents. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The therapeutic effects of the central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI), Tacrine, and/or the anticholinergic/antipsychotic, Chlorpromazine, may be reduced due to antagonism. This interaction may be beneficial when the anticholinergic action is a side effect. AChEIs may also augment the central neurotoxic effect of antipsychotics. Monitor for extrapyramidal symptoms and decreased efficacy of both agents. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Additive QTc-prolongation may occur increasing the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias. Concomitant therapy should be used with caution. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine may decrease the therapeutic effect of Tamoxifen by decreasing the production of active metabolites. Concomitant therapy should be avoided. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine may decrease the therapeutic effect of Tamoxifen by decreasing the production of active metabolites. Concomitant therapy should be avoided. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine, a CYP2D6 inhibitor, may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Tamsulosin, a CYP2D6 substrate. Monitor for changes in therapeutic/adverse effects of Tamsulosin if Chlorpromazine is initiated, discontinued, or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine, a CYP2D6 inhibitor, may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Tamsulosin, a CYP2D6 substrate. Monitor for changes in therapeutic/adverse effects of Tamsulosin if Chlorpromazine is initiated, discontinued, or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Terbinafine may reduce the metabolism and clearance of Chlorpromazine. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for therapeutic/adverse effects of Chlorpromazine if Terbinafine is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine May cause dopamine deficiency. Monitor for Tetrabenazine adverse effects. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Increased risk of cardiotoxicity and arrhythmias (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine May cause additive QTc-prolonging effects. Increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Consider alternate therapy. Thorough risk:benefit assessment is required prior to co-administration. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine May cause additive QTc-prolonging effects. Increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Consider alternate therapy. Thorough risk:benefit assessment is required prior to co-administration. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Tolterodine. Monitor for adverse/toxic effects of Tolterodine. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Tolterodine. Monitor for adverse/toxic effects of Tolterodine. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Additive QTc-prolongation may occur, increasing the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias. Consider alternate therapy. A thorough risk:benefit assessment is required prior to co-administration. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine may decrease the effect of Tramadol by decreasing active metabolite production. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The 2D6 inhibitor, Trazodone, may increase the efficacy of Chlorpromazine by decreasing Chlorpromazine metabolism and clearance. Monitor for changes in Chlorpromazine efficacy if Trazodone is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The 2D6 inhibitor, Trazodone, may increase the efficacy of Chlorpromazine by decreasing Chlorpromazine metabolism and clearance. Monitor for changes in Chlorpromazine efficacy if Trazodone is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Trimethobenzamide and Chlorpromazine, two anticholinergics, may cause additive anticholinergic effects and enhance their adverse/toxic effects. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic effects. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Additive QTc-prolongation may occur, increasing the risk of serious ventricular arrhythmias. Chlorpromazine, a strong CYP2D6 inhibitor, may also decrease the metabolism and clearance of Trimipramine, a CYP2D6 substrate. Caution should be used during concomitant therapy. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The antihistamine, Triprolidine, may increase the arrhythmogenic effect of the phenothiazine, Chlorpromazine. Monitor for symptoms of ventricular arrhythmias. Additive anticholinergic and CNS depressant effects may also occur. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic and CNS depressant effects. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine The antihistamine, Triprolidine, may increase the arrhythmogenic effect of the phenothiazine, Chlorpromazine. Monitor for symptoms of ventricular arrhythmias. Additive anticholinergic and CNS depressant effects may also occur. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic and CNS depressant effects. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Trospium and Chlorpromazine, two anticholinergics, may cause additive anticholinergic effects and enhanced adverse/toxic effects. Monitor for enhanced anticholinergic effects. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine, a CYP2D6 inhibitor, may decrease the metabolism and clearance of Venlafaxine, a CYP2D6 substrate. Monitor for changes in therapeutic/adverse effects of Venlafaxine if Chlorpromazine is initiated, discontinued, or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Additive QTc prolongation may occur. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for QTc prolongation as this can lead to Torsade de Pointes (TdP). (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Additive QTc-prolonging effects may increase the risk of severe arrhythmias. Concomitant therapy is contraindicated. (source: Drug Bank)
chlorpromazine Additive QTc prolongation may occur. Consider alternate therapy or use caution and monitor for QTc prolongation as this can lead to Torsade de Pointes (TdP). Chlorpromazine, a strong CYP2D6 inhibitor, may increase the serum concentration of zuclopenthixol by decreasing its metabolism. Consider alternate therapy or monitor for changes in the therapeutic and adverse effects of zuclopenthixol if chlorpromazine is initiated, discontinued or dose changed. (source: Drug Bank)

Curated Information ?

Relationships from National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT)

May Treat
Contraindicated With

Publications related to chlorpromazine: 48

No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
The genetics of pro-arrhythmic adverse drug reactions. British journal of clinical pharmacology. 2014. Petropoulou Evmorfia, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Sexual dysfunction in male schizophrenia: influence of antipsychotic drugs, prolactin and polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor genes. Pharmacogenomics. 2011. Zhang Xiang Rong, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Very important pharmacogene summary: ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein). Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2011. Hodges Laura M, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Association of an UCP4 (SLC25A27) haplotype with ultra-resistant schizophrenia. Pharmacogenomics. 2011. Mouaffak Fayçal, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Drug-induced long QT syndrome. Pharmacological reviews. 2010. Kannankeril Prince, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Polymorphisms of the HTR2C gene and antipsychotic-induced weight gain: an update and meta-analysis. Pharmacogenomics. 2010. Sicard Michelle N, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
PharmGKB summary: dopamine receptor D2. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2010. Mi Huaiyu, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
D2 receptor genetic variation and clinical response to antipsychotic drug treatment: a meta-analysis. The American journal of psychiatry. 2010. Zhang Jian-Ping, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Coprescription of tamoxifen and medications that inhibit CYP2D6. Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 2010. Sideras Kostandinos, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Cytochrome P450 2D6. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2009. Owen Ryan P, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce a very broad, pleiotropic anticancer drug resistance phenotype in acute myeloid leukemia cells by modulation of multiple ABC transporter genes. Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. 2009. Hauswald Stefanie, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Genetic determinants of response to clopidogrel and cardiovascular events. The New England journal of medicine. 2009. Simon Tabassome, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Effects of DRD2/ANKK1 gene variations and clinical factors on aripiprazole efficacy in schizophrenic patients. Journal of psychiatric research. 2009. Shen Yu-Chih, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Redox regulation of multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. Antioxidants & redox signaling. 2009. Kuo Macus Tien. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Several major antiepileptic drugs are substrates for human P-glycoprotein. Neuropharmacology. 2008. Luna-Tortós Carlos, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Structure, function and regulation of P-glycoprotein and its clinical relevance in drug disposition. Xenobiotica; the fate of foreign compounds in biological systems. 2008. Zhou S-F. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
BDNF gene is a genetic risk factor for schizophrenia and is related to the chlorpromazine-induced extrapyramidal syndrome in the Chinese population. Pharmacogenetics and genomics. 2008. Xu Ming-Qing, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Polymorphisms in the drug transporter gene ABCB1 predict antidepressant treatment response in depression. Neuron. 2008. Uhr Manfred, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Citalopram enantiomers in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of ABCB1 genotyped depressive patients and clinical response: a pilot study. Pharmacological research : the official journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society. 2008. Nikisch Georg, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Exploring genetic variations that may be associated with the direct effects of some antipsychotics on lipid levels. Schizophrenia research. 2008. de Leon Jose, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
The relationship between the therapeutic response to risperidone and the dopamine D2 receptor polymorphism in Chinese schizophrenia patients. The international journal of neuropsychopharmacology / official scientific journal of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum (CINP). 2007. Xing Qinghe, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA VA No VIP available No VIP available
Functional polymorphisms of the cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene and prolonged QTc interval in schizophrenia. Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry. 2007. Tay Joshua K X, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Risk of extrapyramidal syndrome in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotics: a population-based study. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2007. Yang S-Y, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Relative activation of human pregnane X receptor versus constitutive androstane receptor defines distinct classes of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 inducers. The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics. 2007. Faucette Stephanie R, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Cobalamin potentiates vinblastine cytotoxicity through downregulation of mdr-1 gene expression in HepG2 cells. Cellular physiology and biochemistry : international journal of experimental cellular physiology, biochemistry, and pharmacology. 2007. Marguerite Véronique, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Mechanism of inhibition of P-glycoprotein mediated efflux by vitamin E TPGS: influence on ATPase activity and membrane fluidity. Molecular pharmaceutics. 2007. Collnot Eva-Maria, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
RGS4 genotype is not associated with antipsychotic medication response in schizophrenia. Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996). 2006. Kampman O, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Gefitinib modulates the function of multiple ATP-binding cassette transporters in vivo. Cancer research. 2006. Leggas Markos, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Impact of P-glycoprotein on clopidogrel absorption. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2006. Taubert Dirk, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
DRD2 promoter region variation as a predictor of sustained response to antipsychotic medication in first-episode schizophrenia patients. The American journal of psychiatry. 2006. Lencz Todd, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Single nucleotide polymorphisms in human P-glycoprotein: its impact on drug delivery and disposition. Expert opinion on drug delivery. 2006. Dey Surajit. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Association study of 12 polymorphisms spanning the dopamine D(2) receptor gene and clozapine treatment response in two treatment refractory/intolerant populations. Psychopharmacology. 2005. Hwang Rudi, et al. PubMed
Response to chlorpromazine treatment may be associated with polymorphisms of the DRD2 gene in Chinese schizophrenic patients. Neuroscience letters. 2005. Wu Shengnan, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Influence of lipid lowering fibrates on P-glycoprotein activity in vitro. Biochemical pharmacology. 2004. Ehrhardt Manuela, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Interactions of human P-glycoprotein with simvastatin, simvastatin acid, and atorvastatin. Pharmaceutical research. 2004. Hochman Jerome H, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Polymorphisms in human MDR1 (P-glycoprotein): recent advances and clinical relevance. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 2004. Marzolini Catia, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Genetic polymorphisms of the human MDR1 drug transporter. Annual review of pharmacology and toxicology. 2003. Schwab Matthias, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Med-psych drug-drug interactions update. Psychosomatics. 2002. Armstrong Scott C, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
The -141C Ins/Del polymorphism in the dopamine D2 receptor gene promoter region is associated with anxiolytic and antidepressive effects during treatment with dopamine antagonists in schizophrenic patients. Pharmacogenetics. 2001. Suzuki A, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Interaction of omeprazole, lansoprazole and pantoprazole with P-glycoprotein. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's archives of pharmacology. 2001. Pauli-Magnus C, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
The role of intestinal P-glycoprotein in the interaction of digoxin and rifampin. The Journal of clinical investigation. 1999. Greiner B, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Biochemical, cellular, and pharmacological aspects of the multidrug transporter. Annual review of pharmacology and toxicology. 1999. Ambudkar S V, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Lack of association between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the dopamine-2 receptor gene and clozapine response. Pharmacogenetics. 1998. Arranz M J, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available CA No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Functional polymorphism of -141C Ins/Del in the dopamine D2 receptor gene promoter and schizophrenia. Psychiatry research. 1998. Ohara K, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Inhibition of human hepatic cytochrome P4502E1 by azole antifungals, CNS-active drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Xenobiotica; the fate of foreign compounds in biological systems. 1998. Tassaneeyakul W, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
Competitive, non-competitive and cooperative interactions between substrates of P-glycoprotein as measured by its ATPase activity. Biochimica et biophysica acta. 1997. Litman T, et al. PubMed
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Quinidine inhibits the 7-hydroxylation of chlorpromazine in extensive metabolisers of debrisoquine. European journal of clinical pharmacology. 1996. Muralidharan G, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available VIP No VIP available
P-glycoprotein structure and evolutionary homologies. Cytotechnology. 1993. Croop J M. PubMed

LinkOuts

Web Resource:
Wikipedia
National Drug Code Directory:
0781-1715-01
DrugBank:
DB00477
ChEBI:
3647
KEGG Compound:
C06906
KEGG Drug:
D00270
PubChem Compound:
2726
PubChem Substance:
148556
46508395
IUPHAR Ligand:
83
Drugs Product Database (DPD):
21342
ChemSpider:
2625
Therapeutic Targets Database:
DAP000374
FDA Drug Label at DailyMed:
f15e9f35-1e3e-4217-b8e2-1d6096dbee1b

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention chlorpromazine and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.