Drug/Small Molecule:
betamethasone

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PharmGKB contains no Clinical Variants that meet the highest level of criteria.

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The annotations do not account for individual variations among patients, and cannot be considered inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of other treatments. It remains the responsibility of the health-care provider to determine the best course of treatment for a patient. Adherence to any guideline is voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding its application to be made solely by the clinician and the patient. PharmGKB assumes no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the PharmGKB clinical annotations, or for any errors or omissions.

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This is a non-comprehensive list of genetic tests with pharmacogenetics relevance, typically submitted by the manufacturer and manually curated by PharmGKB. The information listed is provided for educational purposes only and does not constitute an endorsement of any listed test or manufacturer.

A more complete listing of genetic tests is found at the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).

PGx Test Variants Assayed Gene?
2D structure from PubChem
provided by PubChem

Overview

Generic Names
Trade Names
  • Alphatrex
  • Bebate
  • Becort
  • Bedifos
  • Beta-Methasone
  • Beta-Methasone Alcohol
  • Beta-Val
  • Betacorlan
  • Betacortril
  • Betaderm
  • Betadexamethasone
  • Betafluorene
  • Betamamallet
  • Betametasona [INN-Spanish]
  • Betametasone [DCIT]
  • Betamethasone Alcohol
  • Betamethasone Base
  • Betamethasone Cream
  • Betamethasone Dipropionate
  • Betamethasone Sodium Phosphate
  • Betamethasone Valearate
  • Betamethasone Valerate
  • Betamethasone [Usan:Ban:Inn:Jan]
  • Betamethasonum [INN-Latin]
  • Betamethasonvalerat Mikron
  • Betamethazone
  • Betapredol
  • Betasolon
  • Betatrex
  • Betnelan
  • Betsolan
  • Celestene
  • Celestone
  • Celestone Syrup and Tablets
  • Cidoten
  • Dermabet
  • Desacort-Beta
  • Diproderm
  • Diprolene
  • Diprolene AF
  • Diprosone
  • Flubenisolone
  • Hormezon
  • Lotrisone
  • Luxiq
  • Luxiqo
  • Maxivate
  • Methazon
  • Rinderon
  • Rinderon A
  • Uticort
  • Valisone
  • Valnac
  • Visubeta
Brand Mixture Names
  • Lotrisone (betamethasone + clotrimazole)

PharmGKB Accession Id:
PA164754818

Description

A glucocorticoid given orally, parenterally, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. Its lack of mineralocorticoid properties makes betamethasone particularly suitable for treating cerebral edema and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p724)

Source: Drug Bank

Indication

Topical use (cream, lotion and ointment): for relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses<br/>*Topical use (foam):* relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses of the scalp<br/>*Systemic use:* for the treatment of edocrine disorders, rheumatic disorders, collagen diseases, dermatological diseases, allergic states, ophthalmic diseases, respiratory diseases, hematologic disorders, neoplastic diseases, edematous states, gastrointestinal diseases, tuberculous meningitis and trichinosis.

Source: Drug Bank

Other Vocabularies

Information pulled from DrugBank has not been reviewed by PharmGKB.

Pharmacology, Interactions, and Contraindications

Mechanism of Action

Betamethasone is a glucocorticoid receptor agonist. This leads to changes in genetic expression once this complex binds to the GRE. The antiinflammatory actions of corticosteroids are thought to involve lipocortins, phospholipase A2 inhibitory proteins which, through inhibition arachidonic acid, control the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The immune system is suppressed by corticosteroids due to a decrease in the function of the lymphatic system, a reduction in immunoglobulin and complement concentrations, the precipitation of lymphocytopenia, and interference with antigen-antibody binding. Betamethasone binds to plasma transcortin, and it becomes active when it is not bound to transcortin.

Source: Drug Bank

Pharmacology

Betamethasone and its derivatives, betamethasone sodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate, are synthetic glucocorticoids. Used for its antiinflammatory or immunosuppressive properties, betamethasone is combined with a mineralocorticoid to manage adrenal insufficiency and is used in the form of betamethasone benzoate, betamethasone dipropionate, or betamethasone valerate for the treatment of inflammation due to corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. Betamethasone and clotrimazole are used together to treat cutaneous tinea infections.

Source: Drug Bank

Food Interaction

Take with food to reduce irritation.

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination & Toxicity

Biotransformation

Hepatic

Source: Drug Bank

Protein Binding

64%

Source: Drug Bank

Absorption

Minimal if applied topically.

Source: Drug Bank

Half-Life

5.6 hours

Source: Drug Bank

Toxicity

Symptoms of overdose include burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, and miliaria.

Source: Drug Bank

Chemical Properties

Chemical Formula

C22H29FO5

Source: Drug Bank

Isomeric SMILES

C[C@H]1C[C@H]2[C@@H]3CCC4=CC(=O)C=C[C@@]4([C@]3([C@H](C[C@@]2([C@]1(C(=O)CO)O)C)O)F)C

Source: OpenEye

Canonical SMILES

C[C@H]1C[C@H]

Source: Drug Bank

Average Molecular Weight

392.4611

Source: Drug Bank

Monoisotopic Molecular Weight

392.199902243

Source: Drug Bank

PharmGKB Curated Pathways

Pathways created internally by PharmGKB based primarily on literature evidence.

PharmGKB contains no curated pathways for this drug. If you would like to volunteer to work on a pathway, please let us know.

External Pathways

Links to non-PharmGKB pathways.

  1. chromatin remodeling by hswi/snf atp-dependent complexes - (BioCarta via Pathway Interaction Database)
  2. corticosteroids and cardioprotection - (BioCarta via Pathway Interaction Database)

Genes that are associated with this drug in PharmGKB's database based on (1) variant annotations, (2) literature review, (3) pathways or (4) information automatically retrieved from DrugBank, depending on the "evidence" and "source" listed below.

Drug Targets

Gene Description
ANXA1 (source: Drug Bank)
NR3C1 (source: Drug Bank)

Drug Interactions

Drug Description
betamethasone The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the salicylate, acetylsalicylic acid. (source: Drug Bank)
acenocoumarol The corticosteroid, betamethasone, alters the anticoagulant effect, acenocoumarol. (source: Drug Bank)
ambenonium The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the anticholinesterase, ambenonium. (source: Drug Bank)
amobarbital The barbiturate, amobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
anisindione The corticosteroid, betamethasone, alters the anticoagulant effect of anisindione. (source: Drug Bank)
aprobarbital The barbiturate, aprobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
butabarbital The barbiturate, butabarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
butalbital The barbiturate, butalbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
butethal The barbiturate, butethal, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
dicumarol The corticosteroid, betamethasone, alters the anticoagulant effect of dicumarol. (source: Drug Bank)
edrophonium The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the anticholinesterase, edrophonium. (source: Drug Bank)
ethotoin The enzyme inducer, ethotoin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
fosphenytoin The enzyme inducer, fosphenytoin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
heptabarbital The barbiturate, heptabarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
hexobarbital The barbiturate, hexobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
mephenytoin The enzyme inducer, mephenytoin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
methohexital The barbiturate, methohexital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
methylphenobarbital The barbiturate, methylphenobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
midodrine Increased arterial pressure (source: Drug Bank)
pentobarbital The barbiturate, pentobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
phenobarbital The barbiturate, phenobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
phenytoin The enzyme inducer, phenytoin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
primidone The barbiturate, primidone, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
pyridostigmine The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the anticholinesterase, pyridostigmine. (source: Drug Bank)
quinidine The barbiturate, quinidine barbiturate, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
rifampin The enzyme inducer, rifampin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
salicylate-sodium The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the salicylate, salicylate-sodium. (source: Drug Bank)
salsalate The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the salicylate, salsalate. (source: Drug Bank)
secobarbital The barbiturate, secobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
talbutal The barbiturate, talbutal, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
trisalicylate-choline The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the salicylate, trisalicylate-choline. (source: Drug Bank)
warfarin The corticosteroid, betamethasone, alters the anticoagulant effect of warfarin. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The enzyme inducer, fosphenytoin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone Increased arterial pressure (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The barbiturate, phenobarbital, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The enzyme inducer decreases the effect of the corticosteroid (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The enzyme inducer, phenytoin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The barbiturate, primidone, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The corticosteroid, betamethasone, may decrease the effect of the anticholinesterase, pyridostigmine. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone The enzyme inducer, rifampin, may decrease the effect of the corticosteroid, betamethasone. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone Tacrine and Betamethasone may independently exacerbate muscle weakness in myasthenia gravis patients. Monitor for additive muscle weakness effects. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone Trastuzumab may increase the risk of neutropenia and anemia. Monitor closely for signs and symptoms of adverse events. (source: Drug Bank)
betamethasone Vecuronium may increase the adverse neuromuscular effects of systemic corticosteroids, such as Betamethasone. Monitor for increased muscle weakness and signs of polyneuropathies and myopathy. (source: Drug Bank)

Publications related to betamethasone: 2

No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Impact of CYP polymorphisms, ethnicity and sex differences in metabolism on dosing strategies: the case of efavirenz. European journal of clinical pharmacology. 2014. Naidoo Panjasaram, et al. PubMed
No Dosing Guideline available No Drug Label available No Clinical Annotation available No Variant Annotation available No VIP available No VIP available
Pharmacogenetics in reproductive and perinatal medicine. Pharmacogenomics. 2010. Alfirevic Ana, et al. PubMed

LinkOuts

Web Resource:
Wikipedia
National Drug Code Directory:
0085-0942-05
DrugBank:
DB00443
ChEBI:
3077
KEGG Drug:
D00244
PubChem Compound:
9782
PubChem Substance:
152998
46505155
Drugs Product Database (DPD):
716618
ChemSpider:
9399
Therapeutic Targets Database:
DAP001043
FDA Drug Label at DailyMed:
8940d60f-f35c-457f-839f-2cb46c00e22e

Clinical Trials

These are trials that mention betamethasone and are related to either pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics.

Common Searches

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Sources for PharmGKB drug information: DrugBank, Open Eye Scientific Software.